Colonel Henry Steel Olcott

by | Jul 20, 2017 | Blog, Uncategorized

[cs_content][cs_section parallax=”false” style=”margin: 0px;padding: 45px 0px;”][cs_row inner_container=”true” marginless_columns=”false” style=”margin: 0px auto;padding: 0px;”][cs_column bg_color=”hsl(0, 15%, 90%)” fade=”false” fade_animation=”in” fade_animation_offset=”45px” fade_duration=”750″ type=”2/3″ style=”padding: 0px;”][cs_text]
Colonel Henry Steel Olcott 2 August 1832 – 17 February 1907) enjoyed a remarkable life an American military officer, journalist, lawyer, co-founder and first President of the Theosophical Society and inspiration to the revival of Buddhism and Nationalism in Sri Lanka.

From 1858 to 1860 Olcott was the agricultural correspondent for the New York Tribune at which he learned the journalist’s craft.

During the American Civil War, he served in the Army and afterward was admitted as the Special Commissioner of the War Department in New York. He was later promoted to the rank of colonel and transferred to the Department of the Navy in Washington, DC.

Following the assassination of Abraham Lincoln, he assisted in the investigation of the assassination. Upon leaving the military in 1868 he became a lawyer specializing in insurance, revenue, and fraud.

He came to wide prominence as the first distinguished American to convert to Buddhism, a decision which scandalised high society at the time. His subsequent actions as president of the Theosophical Society, together with those of Helena Blavatsky helped create a renaissance in the study of Buddhism, and was amongst the first to popularise Buddhism to a Western audience.

Remarkably he is canonised in Sri Lanka for helping to shape their modern religious, national and cultural revival identity.

In 1874, he became aware of the séances of the Eddy Brothers of Chittenden, Vermont. His interest aroused, Olcott wrote an article for the New York Sun, in which he investigated Eddy Farms.

His article was popular enough that other papers, such as the New York Daily Graphic, republished it. His 1874 publication People from the Other World began with his early articles concerning the Spiritualist movement.

Also in 1874, Olcott met Helena Blavatsky while both were visiting the Eddy farm. His interest in the Spiritualist movement and his personal chemistry with Blavatsky resulted in the creation of the Theosophical Society barely a year later, in 1875 which he financially supported with him as President and Blavatsky as Secretary.

In December 1878, they left New York in order to move the headquarters of the Society to India. They landed at Bombay on February 16, 1879. Olcott aimed to experience the native country of his spiritual leader, the Buddha and inspect original spiritual and religious texts before translation.

He suspected that versions circulating in the West had drifted some way off the sense of the originals. The headquarters of the Society were established at Adyar, Chennai, as the Theosophical Society Adyar, incorprating the Adyar Library and Research Centre within the headquarters.

Olcott’s main religious interest was Buddhism, and he is commonly known for his work in Sri Lanka. After a two-year correspondence with Ven. Piyarathne Thissa, he and Blavatsky arrived in the then capital Colombo on May 16, 1880.

Helena Blavatsky and Henry Steele Olcott took Five Precepts at the Wijayananda Viharaya located at Weliwatta in Galle on May 19, 1880 and on that day Olcott and Blavatsky were formally acknowledged as Buddhists, further to their previous Stateside declaration.

During his time in Sri Lanka Olcott strove to revive Buddhism within the region, while compiling the tenets of Buddhism for the education of Westerners. It was during this period that he wrote the Buddhist Catechism (1881), which is still used today. It is one of his most enduring contributions to the revival of Buddhism in Sri Lanka.

The text outlines what Olcott saw to be the basic doctrines of Buddhism, including the life of the Buddha, the message of the Dharma, the role of the Sangha.

The text also treats how the Buddha’s message correlates with contemporary society. Olcott was considered by South Asians and others as a Buddhist revivalist, and his work resonated back in the West too.

The Theosophists combination of spiritualism and science to investigate the supernatural reflected the society’s desire to combine of religion and reason and to produce a rationally spiritual movement.

This “occult science” within the Theosophical Society was used to find the “truth” behind all of the world’s major religions. Through their research, Olcott and Blavatsky concluded that Buddhism best embodied elements of what they found significant in all religions.

The Theosophical Society built several Buddhist schools in Ceylon, most notably Ananda College in Colombo, Mahinda College in Galle, Dharmaraja College in Kandy and Maliyadeva College in Kurunegala. Olcott also acted as an adviser to the committee appointed to design a Buddhist flag in 1885.

The Buddhist flag designed with the assistance of Olcott was later adopted as a symbol by the World Fellowship of Buddhists and as the universal flag of all Buddhist traditions.

Helena Blavatsky eventually went to live in London, where she died in 1891, but Olcott stayed in India and pursued the work of the Theosophical Society there.

Olcott’s role in the Theosophical Society would still be as President, but the induction of Annie Besant sparked a new era of the movement. Upon his death, the Theosophical Society elected her to take over as President and leader of the movement.
[/cs_text][/cs_column][cs_column fade=”false” fade_animation=”in” fade_animation_offset=”45px” fade_duration=”750″ type=”1/3″ style=”padding: 0px;”][x_image type=”none” src=”https://jane-osborne.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/07/colonel-steel-olcott.jpg” alt=”” link=”false” href=”#” title=”” target=”” info=”none” info_place=”top” info_trigger=”hover” info_content=””][/cs_column][/cs_row][/cs_section][/cs_content]

0 0 votes
Article Rating
Subscribe
Notify of
guest
0 Comments
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments

Related Posts

Using introspective hypnosis, uncover the mysteries that may lie behind your physical and mental issues. Uncover the unique essence within each of us that goes deeper than our personalities. 

Releasing old patterns and thought forms brings you back into alignment. Awaken your soul, encourage your awareness and protect your boundaries in particular situations. 

I work one to one or in groups and offer sessions online via zoom and Whatsapp. 

Understanding the past, healing the trauma in a safe environment, releasing pain, it is all part of the journey.

Releasing Attachments and Shadows 
Many people feel that there is something holding them back- but they are not sure what it is. Repetitive behaviours, irrational fears and phobias, emotional paralysis, and unexplained illnesses can all be manifestations of attachments and shadows – events and encounters from the past which continue to haunt us. 

My regressions can target and uncover these attachments and shadows and  help you to understand them, enabling you  to let them go, thereby healing past traumas. 

Are you ready for your Journey? 


There is no way of knowing what you will experience during regression therapy.

People’s experiences can be very different. Some people may see glimpses of several past lives, whilst others may delve into one life in more detail, unearthing repressed memories that no longer serve them.

You may have been described by friends as an old soul or feel you have lived before. Some people can visit a place for the first time, yet instantly feel that it is familiar. Others speak of meeting someone for the first time yet feel as if they have known them all their lives.

A sound, smell, dream, or reaction to a situation can trigger memories of a past life experience. The smell of a perfume that your mother wore.

Some clients talk of souls that have chosen to reincarnate together such as partners, siblings, or friends to carry out tasks. An example would be a daughter who acts like the mother of the family or a strong connection with a relative who may have been your brother in a past life.

Some people may try past life regression out of curiosity, to see who they were in the past.

Others are in search of a path for personal growth and healing. Both are equally valid reasons for embarking on this therapy.

If you are feeling stuck in certain ways of thinking, feelings and behaviours, hypnotherapy can help enormously. It assists you in reframing negative thoughts and behaviours and encourages you to understand the reasons for this. It can help tip the feeling of loss upside down and allow you to view it in a positive way as you move to a higher understanding of situations. For example, instead of feeling like a relationship was a failure, hypnotherapy can help you see how the relationship helped you learn, understand, grow, and become more compassionate.

You hold the key to release yourself from past trauma, dreams and attachments from past lives locked in your memory. You will see things from a different perspective and realise you are more than what you see .
Opening the doors to past life records and working with them helps to release the chains of the past.  

As a client, you are fully awake and aware of everything going on around you. When I ask you a question, you have control of your mouth and body and express through words, what you are sensing (feeling, seeing hearing, knowing), what you are experiencing in your memory or what feels like your “imagination”.


To traverse through these memories, we discuss the issues that you would like to address at the beginning of the session.During my hypnosis sessions, there may be times when loved ones, lost souls, extra-terrestrials, or other beings have a message for my clients. You may just be curious but for those looking deeper for answers – there is soul work to do.